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Omitting the Hour Lines On a Daily Calendar

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000100957D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 3 page(s) / 105K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cookson, BL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In a manual calendar system having day pages (there are many now available), it is typical to have a "time grid" where events for the day can be handwritten in a position relative to the start and end times of the events. See Fig. 2 showing such a page.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 94% of the total text.

Omitting the Hour Lines On a Daily Calendar

       In a manual calendar system having day pages (there are
many now available), it is typical to have a "time grid" where events
for the day can be handwritten in a position relative to the start
and end times of the events.  See Fig. 2 showing such a page.

      In a computer calendar system which has a print function, the
events are entered into the event data base using some terminal or
other computer process.  This makes the interval lines unnecessary
for the purpose of writing events.  To add an event to the printed
page, the computer calendar user would add the event to the event
data base and then re-print the pages changed.  See Fig. 3.  This
shows a page where the lines are omitted when printing the same data
as in Fig. 2.  For some, the page without lines is cleaner and easier
to see than the page with lines.

      Refer now to Fig. 1.  This shows a typical computer screen used
in the calendar print function where the user can select whether to
print the lines or not.

      This method takes these steps:  1) The user of the calendar
print function selects whether or not to print the lines.  2) This
choice is passed to the page print function where the pages are laid
out with or without lines.  3) The day pages are printed.

      The page without lines is considered to be easier to see and
therefore more useful, without losing any ability to enter events and
place them in the printed...