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Interface Toughening by Ion Implantation for Enhancement of Thin Film Adhesion

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000100966D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 3 page(s) / 134K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Baglin, J: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Good adhesion of thin films on substrates for which they may have no bulk chemical affinity is a requirement for many technologies, e.g., metallization of semiconductor devices or ceramic packaging modules.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 50% of the total text.

Interface Toughening by Ion Implantation for Enhancement of Thin Film Adhesion

       Good adhesion of thin films on substrates for which they
may have no bulk chemical affinity is a requirement for many
technologies, e.g., metallization of semiconductor devices or ceramic
packaging modules.

      Present techniques, using a reactive metal interlayer, are not
reliable, and depend on complex, hard-to-control processes such as
partial oxidation of that interlayer.

      Direct chemical bonding at interfaces can be achieved by the
use of inert ion species - either implanted through an existing
interface or as a means of substrate surface activation by sputtering
prior to deposition of the film.

      Interface adhesion of thin films is governed partly by the
quality of chemical or metallic bonding of atoms at the interface.
However, adhesion failure is also strongly dependent on the ability
of a physical crack to develop and propagate, either at the interface
or within the body of film or substrate.  Prevention of crack
initiation and propagation in the interface region will inhibit
adhesion failure.

      Ion implantation has been found to be effective in inhibiting
surface cracks in bulk metal parts which would otherwise lead to
fatigue failure.  Implantation of suitably chosen ions at and near a
film-substrate interface should likewise be capable of inhibiting
interface cracking and consequent loss of adhesion.

      Application of fracture toughening to the interface itself, and
preferably also to the materials of both substrate and film in the
region of the interface, is proposed.  This can be achieved in a
favorable way by ion implantation of a suitably chosen ion species.

      The implantation must be engineered to achieve solid-solution
or precipitation toughening.  The following conditions must therefore
be satisfied:
1.   The energy must be chosen to deposit ions at and near the
interface (see Fig. 3).
2.   The ion species must be chosen to optimize fracture toughening
at the interface, and preferably also in both film and substrate
material.  Such toughening can be accomplished by bonded precipitates
(i.e., precipitates which have interatomic bond attachment to
materials surrounding them).
3.   Dose and implantation temperature must be selected to optimize
the resulting fracture toughness of the interface (and adjoining
materials).  This involves considerations of both chemical
interactions and the size, shape and distribution of precipitates
best able to pin a developing crack or prevent its initiation (Fig.
2).  Precipitates of approximately 10 nm diameter evenly distributed
within the interface region would typically be required.

      Toughening of the interface alone will be effective. However,
adjoining materials may then crack instead when some detachment force
is applied.  The toughening of those adjoining materials by the same
process will be advantageous, since the toug...