Browse Prior Art Database

Dynamic Object Pair Validation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000100972D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 2 page(s) / 80K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Franklin, SM: AUTHOR

Abstract

In a system with a graphical, iconic user interface, it is often desirable to provide the user feedback concerning the validity of "dropping" iconic objects on top of other objects in the system. Typically, the validity of a direct manipulation action is determined dynamically when the objects involved have been properly identified. In a high performance object-oriented programming environment, the validity may be negotiated between the two objects, without the system intervening in any way or retaining knowledge about the properties of the objects involved. In the absence of such an environment, an integrated system can store rules about the validity of pairing each object in the system with the other known objects in the system.

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Dynamic Object Pair Validation

       In a system with a graphical, iconic user interface, it
is often desirable to provide the user feedback concerning the
validity of "dropping" iconic objects on top of other objects in the
system.  Typically, the validity of a direct manipulation action is
determined dynamically when the objects involved have been properly
identified.  In a high performance object-oriented programming
environment, the validity may be negotiated between the two objects,
without the system intervening in any way or retaining knowledge
about the properties of the objects involved.  In the absence of such
an environment, an integrated system can store rules about the
validity of pairing each object in the system with the other known
objects in the system.  However, as new objects are created that can
interact with existing objects in the system, they cannot easily
change the established object interaction rules provided by the
system.

      This article describes a method for storing object-to-object
direct manipulation validity rules, in the absence of an object-
oriented programming environment, in such a manner that new objects
may be added to the system and participate in direct manipulation
actions by adding to the existing valid rule set.  Prior solutions
called for each object to store a list of all of the objects with
which it could participate in a meaningful direct manipulation
action.  For example, the "document" object could keep a list
containing all of the objects it could be dropped on, including a
printer and a trash can.  However, if a new object was added to the
system, the document would not know about this object and the system
would provide negative visual feedback when the document was passed
over the new object.  Even if this new object understood how to
process documents, the system would indicate that there was no valid
relationship between the document and the new object.

      This invention calls...