Browse Prior Art Database

Fast Take-Off Taper/Flat Slider

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000100986D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 2 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bolasna, SA: AUTHOR

Abstract

Many of the current disk files utilize a so-called "start/stop in contact" system in which the slider is in contact with the disk while it both starts and stops its operation. The slider contact between the slider and the disk during the many start/stop operations that occur during the life of the disk file wears down the surface of the magnetic disk. To minimize the wear caused by this sliding contact, several areas have been investigated. The optimization of the performance of the disk surface lubricant can result in the minimization of the disk wear. In addition, self-loading sliders have been proposed that take off from the disk quickly, thus minimizing the time the slider is in contact with the disk.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 66% of the total text.

Fast Take-Off Taper/Flat Slider

       Many of the current disk files utilize a so-called
"start/stop in contact" system in which the slider is in contact with
the disk while it both starts and stops its operation.  The slider
contact between the slider and the disk during the many start/stop
operations that occur during the life of the disk file wears down the
surface of the magnetic disk.  To minimize the wear caused by this
sliding contact, several areas have been investigated.  The
optimization of the performance of the disk surface lubricant can
result in the minimization of the disk wear. In addition,
self-loading sliders have been proposed that take off from the disk
quickly, thus minimizing the time the slider is in contact with the
disk.

      Another solution to this problem is to design the slider with a
positive crown that is restricted to a very specific range.  The
specific range is a function of the product flying height, disk
radius, and rpm.  As can be seen from Fig. 1, the take-off velocity
plotted as a function of crown is very steep and flattens out beyond
25 nm of crown (in this example).  By comparing Fig. 1 and Fig. 2, it
can be seen that the take-off velocity is much more sensitive to
crown than to rail width (or any other slider parameter).  Both
figures are simulation models of 3380-type sliders.

      Thus, the crown mean should be large enough so that the mean
less the manufacturing tolerance is always greater than 25 nm. ...