Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Visual Cues for Truncated Text Fields

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000101025D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 2 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Temple, AC: AUTHOR

Abstract

Text fields for both display and entry of information on a VDU screen sometimes show less information than really exists. A visual aid must indicate this situation to allow the extra information to be scrolled.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 62% of the total text.

Visual Cues for Truncated Text Fields

       Text fields for both display and entry of information on
a VDU screen sometimes show less information than really exists.  A
visual aid must indicate this situation to allow the extra
information to be scrolled.

      The IBM User Interface Standard for System Application
Architecture (SAA), Common User Access (CUA), provides a mechanism
for scrolling text that is only partly displayed in an entry/display
field.  The extent of the field is indicated by a rectangular frame.
An example is shown in Fig. 1 where the text extends beyond the right
of the field, so a scroll arrow has been added, providing visual
confirmation as well as a mechanism that allows the user to scroll
the missing text into view.  This technique has limitations.  For
example, the scroll arrow and its frame take up important screen
space and any reduction would be beneficial.  If there are many text
fields within a window that have truncated text, then scroll arrows
appear in numerous places and can be visually disturbing.  When there
is a column of entry fields and one or more have truncated text, the
scroll arrows appear scattered down the column and look untidy.  A
scroll arrow at the end of an entry field also conflicts with the
prompt arrow used in a prompted entry field.

      Since truncated text occurs regularly, the disclosed solution
is to use a normal metaphor that most people are aware of - the
ragged line shown in Fig. 2.

   ...