Browse Prior Art Database

Pressure-Sensitive Icons

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000101041D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

O'Hara, JPM: AUTHOR

Abstract

A method is described of visually indicating a third dimension (3D) of input from a user interface pointing device, such as a pressure sensitive 2D touch screen, using 3D graphics modelling techniques. The reader is assumed to have some awareness of computer user interfaces driven by pointing devices, such as mice, light pens or touch screens.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 65% of the total text.

Pressure-Sensitive Icons

       A method is described of visually indicating a third
dimension (3D) of input from a user interface pointing device, such
as a pressure sensitive 2D touch screen, using 3D graphics modelling
techniques.  The reader is assumed to have some awareness of computer
user interfaces driven by pointing devices, such as mice, light pens
or touch screens.

      Visual user interfaces which are driven by pointing devices,
such as mice or light pens, normally indicate user input by a change
in the display, such as the highlighting of an icon.  If the pointing
device is only capable of selecting an x, y position, then the icon
will normally indicate one of two states, i.e. selected or not
selected, on or off.  If the pointing device is capable of indicating
a third dimension of input, such as the pressure applied to an x, y
location on the screen, then it is often desirable to indicate this
third dimension (z) visually.  One way this can be done is by an icon
which resembles a three-dimensional push button.

      As a user-pressure on the screen area increases or decreases,
so the button is seen to press in or return out. This is achieved by
redrawing the button so that the apparent level of depression is a
function of the pressure applied over it.  The relationship between
the pressure and the amount of depression may often be linear, but
not necessarily so.  The button may be drawn so that its
non-depressed position appears to projec...