Browse Prior Art Database

Rework/Overflow Wiring Via Flexible Appliques

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000101154D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 1 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hays, TJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for adding wires to a printed wire assembly or board in order to facilitate an engineering change or accommodate wires that could not be incorporated into the raw board due to wire density. This method utilizes a wiring pattern contained on the surface of a flexible plastic applique, which is attached to the board. This method is considerably faster and more accurate than current methods of placing individual wire segments manually or by numerically controlled machinery. This method is intended for relatively low density rework wiring; see the following article for a description of process modifications required for higher density.

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Rework/Overflow Wiring Via Flexible Appliques

       Disclosed is a method for adding wires to a printed wire
assembly or board in order to facilitate an engineering change or
accommodate wires that could not be incorporated into the raw board
due to wire density.  This method utilizes a wiring pattern contained
on the surface of a flexible plastic applique, which is attached to
the board. This method is considerably faster and more accurate than
current methods of placing individual wire segments manually or by
numerically controlled machinery.  This method is intended for
relatively low density rework wiring; see the following article for a
description of process modifications required for higher density.

      The invention consists of utilizing a flexible applique on the
board in question to replace the wire segments.  The applique is
formed from a sheet of transparent plastic-insulated material that
has been laminated with 1 ounce of copper on its top surface.  This
material is coated with a photoresist and exposed to an artwork
containing the desired wiring pattern, and the undesired copper
removed in an etch process.  After etch, holes are drilled or punched
in the applique.  Holes are of two types:  those for solder
connections and those for component lead clearance, the latter being
larger in diameter than the former.  Solder connection holes are
placed in the middle of connection pads in the circuit pattern, so
that each hole is surrounded by the p...