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Browse Prior Art Database

Improving Throughput in a Paper-Feeding System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000101158D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 2 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Barker, RB: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A simple paper feed system consisting of a motor-driven take-up spool winding up paper pulled from a supply roll is shown in the figure. Paper is pulled from a supply roll over an idler roller, under an emitter roller, across a platen, and wound up on the take-up spool driven by a stepper motor via a belt. The moving paper turns a slotted disk on the emitter roller, interrupting a photosensor. The pulses from the sensor are counted by a microprocessor controlling the stepper motor driving the take-up spool. This design allows accurate paper movement using a minimum of hardware.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 64% of the total text.

Improving Throughput in a Paper-Feeding System

       A simple paper feed system consisting of a motor-driven
take-up spool winding up paper pulled from a supply roll is shown in
the figure.  Paper is pulled from a supply roll over an idler roller,
under an emitter roller, across a platen, and wound up on the take-up
spool driven by a stepper motor via a belt.  The moving paper turns a
slotted disk on the emitter roller, interrupting a photosensor.  The
pulses from the sensor are counted by a microprocessor controlling
the stepper motor driving the take-up spool. This design allows
accurate paper movement using a minimum of hardware.

      The actual paper velocity is dependent upon the rotational
speed of the take-up spool and the amount of paper on the spool.  At
the start of a new supply roll, the paper velocity is slow, but
continually increases as more and more paper is wound on the take-up
spool.  By balancing the torque requirements of the paper feed system
and the available torque output of the drive motor, it is possible to
vary the drive speed of the motor to increase the throughput of the
feed system, especially at the start of a new supply roll.

      The torque requirements of the journal system must consider
both the beginning and end of the roll of paper. For a given amount
of available torque, the force available to pull the paper is force =
torque/radius, where the radius is the radius of the take-up spool
and any accumulated paper.

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