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Application of Identity Keys in the RSA Public Key Cryptosystem

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000101174D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 2 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Martino, MJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

A means is presented for operating the RSA Public Key Cryptosystem with a single key for enciphering and deciphering the data to be secured. This method makes use of a special class of keys (called "identity keys"). Operating the RSA Cryptosystem using a single key has the advantages of simplified control processes and lower costs with no decrease in the security of the system.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Application of Identity Keys in the RSA Public Key Cryptosystem

       A means is presented for operating the RSA Public Key
Cryptosystem with a single key for enciphering and deciphering the
data to be secured.  This method makes use of a special class of keys
(called "identity keys"). Operating the RSA Cryptosystem using a
single key has the advantages of simplified control processes and
lower costs with no decrease in the security of the system.

      The RSA Public Key Cryptosystem was first published in the
Communication of the ACM issue of February, 1978 (Vol. 21, No. 2)
under the title, "A Method of Obtaining Digital Signatures and Public
Key Cryptosystems".  The article was written by R. L. Rivest, A.
Shamir and L. Adleman.  It relates to a class of keys (identity keys)
inherent in the RSA Public Key Cryptosystem.  The special property of
this class of keys and the essential element is the use of a single
identity key for data encryption and decryption using the RSA.

      The RSA Public Key Cryptosystem (see the article mentioned
above for details) enciphers plaintext messages (that have been
translated into convenient length blocks of digits) using the
congruence.
(plaintext) ** e == CIPHERTEXT (mod m).
Notation:  "**" means "exponentiation" and "==" means "is congruent
to".
      Deciphering is done the same way.  That is,
      (CIPHERTEXT) ** d == plaintext (mod m).

      The encrypting key is "3", and "d" is the decryption key.
These keys are computed by picking one of them, typically d, and
solving,
e * d == 1 (mod phi(m)), where "phi(m)" is Eul...