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Scanning Tunneling Photon Microscope

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000101191D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 2 page(s) / 70K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gimzewski, JK: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In a scanning tunneling microscope, a number of processes can occur during tunneling which result in the emission of photons. These photons carry important spectroscopic information that can be spatially resolved. This spatial and energy distribution of the photons emitted from the tip-surface region is employed in the design of a scanning tunneling photon microscope (STPM).

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Scanning Tunneling Photon Microscope

       In a scanning tunneling microscope, a number of processes
can occur during tunneling which result in the emission of photons.
These photons carry important spectroscopic information that can be
spatially resolved.  This spatial and energy distribution of the
photons emitted from the tip-surface region is employed in the design
of a scanning tunneling photon microscope (STPM).

      The key in this design is the optimizing of the collection of
photons while maintaining sufficient structural stability for atomic
resolution work.  The requirements for an STPM, therefore, are: (1)
maximum solid angle for photon collection L, (2) maximum quantum
efficiency detectors with low background noise; and (3) structural
rigidity.

      Maximum L is achieved by arranging the tip-surface region
within an ellipsoidal mirror at one focal point thereof and
collecting the photons at the second focal point via a fiber-optic
cable.  For semitransparent samples permitting operation in
transmission mode, an additional fiber-optic cable may be used.

      Sensitivity is achieved through the use of an optical
multichannel analyzer and spectrometer or cooled multiplier tube with
band-pass interference filter which connects to the optic cable.

      Structural rigidity is in conflict with maximum collection
efficiency.  To overcome this problem, the structural environment
should be optimized to use only about 25% of the available...