Browse Prior Art Database

Diskette Stack Using Velcro

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000101211D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 5 page(s) / 169K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

McLean, JG: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a mechanism for arranging diskettes. In particular, disclosed is a Velcro/plastic mechanism for diskette arranging and for the prevention of diskette bending. In addition, label cards which sit on a diskette or in a diskette paper sleeve are discussed. With this method, no particular diskette container size is needed.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Diskette Stack Using Velcro

       Disclosed is a mechanism for arranging diskettes.  In
particular, disclosed is a Velcro/plastic mechanism for diskette
arranging and for the prevention of diskette bending.  In addition,
label cards which sit on a diskette or in a diskette paper sleeve are
discussed.  With this method, no particular diskette container size
is needed.

      The device described here allows a user to store diskette sets
together without the need for diskette boxes. The diskettes are
easily seen and retrieved as needed. The size of each set of
diskettes is no longer controlled by the size of available boxes.

      Fig. 1 shows a series of diskettes in standard paper jackets 1.
A plastic holder around each diskette has a Velcro strip 2 attached
to the front and back of each jacket. Guides 3 along the top and
bottom of each plastic holder keep each adjacent diskette in position
relative to one another. Label cards 4 are provided which stick out
above the diskettes for easy identification of diskette sets.  Fig. 2
shows an example of the plastic holder. The diskette sleeve is
initially placed between the front 5 and back 6 bar. An adhesive on
the back 7 of each bar attaches the bars to the front and back of
the diskette sleeve when the bars are brought together around the
sleeve. The dashed lines 8 indicate the back bar in the closed
position around the sleeve. A narrow strip 9 at the intersection of
the two bars allows the bars to come together. The bars are stiff
enough to prevent bending of the diskette during handling. Fig. 3
shows a partial right side view of the plastic holder.  A front 10
and back 11 diskette sleeve are partially shown, along with their
corresponding plastic holders 12. The back lip 13 fits into the front
lip 14 of the adjoining holder to keep the diskettes in position when
attached. The male Velcro strip 15 sticks to the female Velcro strip
16 when assembled.

      The advantages of these approaches are:  1) Rolls of velcro
tape may be cheaper than disk boxes.  2) The system can be rearranged
quickly, with blocks of disks moved instead of single disks -- just
pull the velcro apart where needed, and all sections will stick
together as needed.  3) Single disks can still be taken off the
stack.  4) 10 disks put together like this will probably stand up on
end without leaning them against something.  5) This concept may
extend to other media, such as compact disks.  To further enhance the
general idea, provided are colored plastic holders (2 in Fig. 1) and
colored label cards (4 in Fig.  1) so...