Browse Prior Art Database

Flexible Parts Recognition System for Automatic Tool Sequencing Determination

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000101261D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 2 page(s) / 90K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Barnes, RD: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article describes an improved semiconductor module capping tool which automatically senses the type of part present from a variety of possible part sizes and for caps, the module, without the need for operator intervention.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Flexible Parts Recognition System for Automatic Tool Sequencing Determination

       This article describes an improved semiconductor module
capping tool which automatically senses the type of part present from
a variety of possible part sizes and for caps, the module, without
the need for operator intervention.

      The semi-automatic module capping tool receives a capping
fixture containing four modules of the type/size/configuration being
built and displaces the thermal paste on the modules against the
respective caps at a slow, controlled speed until the correct spring
pressure is obtained.  At this point, the fixture retaining plates
are aligned with the appropriate center post groove, and the fixture
is locked by turning the center post 90 degrees.  In the present
embodiment, this final locking position is chosen among three center
post groove heights.

      In the prior art, to handle a variety of part sizes, the tool
would receive its instructions for sequence of operations and final
locking position in one of three ways: operator input of the product
type and consultation of a program data set, use of an encoder or
other counting technique and contact sensors to ascertain what size
part is present, or use of a simple photocell with a set of "flags"
to sense or trigger start and stop positions.  The first of these
options is undesirable in many applications because of potential
operator errors for numerous product types run in a random manner
through the tool.  The second option would be costly to implement.
The third option was most desirable, but would require a unique
application technique to be effective.

      It is not difficult to use a sensor to detect when the press
has neared the fixture, at a trigger position, and should switch from
fast to slow job rate; the problem is that the ranges of trigger
positions for the three locking positions overlap with each other and
the locking position...