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Browse Prior Art Database

Compressing And Decompressing Large Files

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000101316D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 3 page(s) / 116K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Glass, DW: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The technique described here allows a PC user to download time consuming tasks, such as compression and decompression of files, to a parallel processor located in a separate unit or card. This eliminates the wait time usually taken by such operations. The user can continue to use the primary computer while these operations are taking place. This article describes an outboard hardware/software solution that would be seen by the PC as an additional disk drive. The file to be compressed would be sent to the device with a COPY command, for instance. There, it would be compressed or decompressed while the PC would continue doing something else, stored, and read back when convenient.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Compressing And Decompressing Large Files

       The technique described here allows a PC user to download
time consuming tasks, such as compression and decompression of files,
to a parallel processor located in a separate unit or card.  This
eliminates the wait time usually taken by such operations.  The user
can continue to use the primary computer while these operations are
taking place.  This article describes an outboard hardware/software
solution that would be seen by the PC as an additional disk drive.
The file to be compressed would be sent to the device with a COPY
command, for instance.  There, it would be compressed or decompressed
while the PC would continue doing something else, stored, and read
back when convenient.

      The drawing shows an expansion unit (1) similar in size and
function to a normal personal computer expansion unit. Information is
fed from the bus of the personal computer to a memory card in the
unit.  The two buses are not directly hooked together as in a
standard expansion unit.  This allows the bus on this expansion unit
to operate separately from the primary personal computer unit.

      The hard drives (2) are identical to standard hard drives and
store the information, as required, from the various cards in this
device.  The bus contains both short cards (3) and long cards (4)
that are similar except in the number of memory chips that can be
placed on the cards.

      Each card has a fully functional microprocessor (5) such as an
Intel 80386.  Each card has a user replaceable EPROM chip (6) that
supplies the programming for each card. A series of RAM chips (7) are
placed on each card and serve as the memory for each microprocessor.
A user replaceable Programmable Logic Device on each card allows it
to controllably communicate with external units via the edge card
connector (9) on the back of each card.

      Note that each of these cards acts as a separate computing
device.  Parallel Processing is achieved by supplying the appropriate
EPROM code for each card.  Thus, one card can be compressing a
complex file, while another card is simultaneously decompressing
another file.  A third card can be scripting a third file, and so
forth.  As a bonus, the device could be used as a sophisticated
printer buffer.  The device would be an internal plugable card, for
maximum speed.  Alternately, it could also be an external box with
...