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Index Card Metaphor for Multiple Property Sheets Associated With a Given Object

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000101335D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 2 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Berry, RE: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Many objects on a VDU screen have an extensive set of property values that cannot be contained within one window, causing difficulties for the user. To overcome this, it is proposed that an image of a frontal view of a card file is displayed for an 'object' having multiple properties and that the properties are identified on index tabs - shown as projecting above the card portion.

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Index Card Metaphor for Multiple Property Sheets Associated With a Given Object

       Many objects on a VDU screen have an extensive set of
property values that cannot be contained within one window, causing
difficulties for the user.  To overcome this, it is proposed that an
image of a frontal view of a card file is displayed for an 'object'
having multiple properties and that the properties are identified on
index tabs - shown as projecting above the card portion.

      User Interfaces often enable a user to set a number of
properties associated with a single object.  For example, a string of
text may have properties for the type face (font, sheer, point size,
etc.) as well as colour.  It is preferable that the user is able to
access all the properties for a given object with minimum navigation
and, if possible, within a single dialogue window.  However, as more
function is added to the system, it becomes less practical to retain
all properties within a single window.  Two windows become common,
and in some cases four or five are required.

      One standard technique to handle multiple related property
dialogues is to provide one or more "GoTo" push-button images at the
bottom of each property dialogue (Fig. 1).  One push button is
required for each separate property window associated with an object.
There are disadvantages with this technique.  The user is constantly
switching windows, causing visual disruption.  Window switching takes
more time...