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Patterned Sol-Gel Thin Films

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000101357D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 1 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brady, MJ: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A technique is described whereby thin oxide film coatings in a fine pattern are produced by using a combination of sol-gel and photo-lithography. The process uses wet/dry etching methods and is an improvement over previous techniques which used vacuum and CVD deposition processes.

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Patterned Sol-Gel Thin Films

       A technique is described whereby thin oxide film coatings
in a fine pattern are produced by using a combination of sol-gel and
photo-lithography.  The process uses wet/dry etching methods and is
an improvement over previous techniques which used vacuum and CVD
deposition processes.

      The method of producing thin oxide films consists of spin
coating a solution of metal alkoxide(s) onto a smooth substrate.  For
example, a silicon dioxide coating can be formed with a solution of
tetrethoxysilane, water, alcohol, and nitric acid.  Possible
substrates include semiconductor materials such as silicon, gallium
arsenide, and germanium, as well metals such as niobium, titanium
nitride, and copper.

      The coating is dried and partially cured at 200-300oC to remove
the solvents.  Typically, the thicknesses of these sol-gel coatings
are in the range of 0.3-1.0 micron, depending on the spin speed and
the rheology of the solution.  Coatings of other oxides, such as
aluminum oxide and titanium dioxide, can be similarly deposited.

      Photoresist material is then spin coated over the sol-gel
coating in the uncured, partially cured, or fully cured condition.
The photoresist is exposed with a patterned mask and developed,
similar to that used in semiconductor technology.  The exposed
sol-gel is removed by means of chemical etching, such as with
buffered HF, or dry etched in a plasma, such as oxygen and Freon 14.
The etch r...