Browse Prior Art Database

Method of Defaulting the Destination Directory Where Particular Files Are Located

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000101381D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 2 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Killebrew, A: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A method is described in which a personal computer user would not have to type in or take the time to look up the full-path destination directory for certain files.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 81% of the total text.

Method of Defaulting the Destination Directory Where Particular Files Are Located

       A method is described in which a personal computer user
would not have to type in or take the time to look up the full-path
destination directory for certain files.

      The remembering of directory names and which directory name
goes with what files can be very frustrating to the user, especially
if the user is not familiar with the using of full-path directory and
subdirectory names.

      The OS/2* operating system has an external command "PATH" that
sets the path environment for the user.  But OS/2 does not have an
internal DOS function call to perform this procedure.  The running
applications on OS/2 must locate the path environment in memory and
locate the PATH string itself.

      In accordance with the new method, a Destination Directory
Setter Module performs this service automatically for the user.
Before the destination directory panel is shown to the user, this
module is invoked to pre-locate the destination directory for the
particular files.  The user is shown this panel, illustrated in the
figure, with the destination directory already set.  The user then
has the option to change/create or use the current destination
directory, if the user wishes.

      In accordance with the new method, a DOS call is invoked to
"GET ENVIRONMENT".  The returned information is a buffer address with
3 ASCII strings, each terminated by a null byte.  Of the 3 A...