Browse Prior Art Database

Real-Time Data Acquisition And Analysis System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000101430D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 6 page(s) / 321K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Barenboim, M: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a manufacturing system in which data that is gathered in real-time from multiple points in the manufacturing line is immediately analyzed to initiate corrective action, as required. The data acquisition and analysis system (DAAS) is made up of two components: the real-time data acquisition facility and the data analysis tools.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 37% of the total text.

Real-Time Data Acquisition And Analysis System

       Disclosed is a manufacturing system in which data that is
gathered in real-time from multiple points in the manufacturing line
is immediately analyzed to initiate corrective action, as required.
The data acquisition and analysis system (DAAS) is made up of two
components:  the real-time data acquisition facility and the data
analysis tools.

      Fig. 1 shows the communication network of the present
embodiment which is a fully automated printer printhead production
line designed around a control and data acquisition system organized
as a hierarchy of intelligence levels.  It is seen that this assembly
line is divided into eight cells.  Each cell is an independent
automated manufacturing line in itself.  A cell is made up of
workstations in each of which an assembly or test operation is
performed.  A workstation may be as simple as a hard tool or as
complex as a robot, with controller, sensors and hard tool.  Each
workstation is controlled by the lowest level of intelligence, a
modular process controller (MPC). One MPC can accommodate several
workstations.  A representative MPC, with a subordinate Robot, is
shown associated with Cell 2.  It is seen that the next higher
intelligence level is the Cell Controller.  All MPCs communicate with
their respective Cell Controller using a serial protocol.  It is also
seen that all Cell Controllers are subordinate to the Sector
Controller.  The Cell Controllers communicate on a token cell ring.
The Sector Controller supervises the entire line operation and
maintains data traffic.  It is supported by a Data Base Controller
which receives data transactions from the Sector Controller and
either stores the data or passes it on to the engineering workstation
(EWS) microcomputer.

      Single or multiple ESWs can be integrated into this system,
with various physical locations: on the line, in an office a few
hundred feet from the line, or remote with modem-to-modem connection.
The present embodiment uses one EWS located in a manufacturing
engineering office, enabling an engineer to monitor and control the
entire line process from his office.  The EWS of the present
embodiment is a multi- tasking IBM PS/2 Model 80 performing the
following functions:
   * Controlling two asynchronous serial ports.  One port is
dedicated to "test data" transactions while the other port sees

      only "line performance" transactions, such as mode change
        requests and error broadcasts.
      * Accessing and storing data on the hard disk.
      * Providing a host connection.
      * Generating reports for the display, printer and
        plotter.
      * Providing an operator interface.

      The data acquisition facility takes advantage of the
asynchronous design philosophy of the control system, and may be
called event or interrupt driven.  Data is collected automatically:
objective intelligent...