Browse Prior Art Database

Fiber-Optic Single Fiber Interface for Monochrome LCD Display

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000101483D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 2 page(s) / 66K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Miessler, M: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This disclosure describes a method of encoding the required data, synchs and clock pulses such that they can be transmitted serially over a single channel analogue fiber-optic link using available low- cost opto-electronic components. An optical fiber link has advantages over an electrical link. It does not radiate electromagnetic waves or suffer from RFI problems.

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Fiber-Optic Single Fiber Interface for Monochrome LCD Display

       This disclosure describes a method of encoding the
required data, synchs and clock pulses such that they can be
transmitted serially over a single channel analogue fiber-optic link
using available low- cost opto-electronic components.  An optical
fiber link has advantages over an electrical link.  It does not
radiate electromagnetic waves or suffer from RFI problems.

      LCD display panels currently available typically require
parallel pixel data, a dot clock, line and frame synchronization
signals.  In order to obtain a flicker-free display, frame refresh
rates of about 70 Hty are required which implies a pixel rate of
about 25 Mpels/s for a display of about 0.3 Mpel resolution.  The new
technique allows the probability of error to be varied for different
types of data.  For instance, synchronization pulses missed would
have a much more serious effect on the quality of display than the
occasional erroneous data bit, so the probability of error of synchs
can be reduced at the cost of a slightly higher probability of error
of pel data and the overall display quality enhanced.

      A single fiber carries two synchronizing signals, dot clock and
a binary video signal, by encoding them onto seven different
intensity levels (Fig. 1).  The maximum level is used to transfer the
dot clock which occurs regularly in alternate time slots.  The
intermediate time slots are used for the two sync...