Browse Prior Art Database

User Interface Shortcut

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000101488D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Banning, WL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes a computer software technique that allows a user to define a single step function to navigate directly to the function they wish to perform rather than repeating multiple user interactions.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 77% of the total text.

User Interface Shortcut

       This article describes a computer software technique that
allows a user to define a single step function to navigate directly
to the function they wish to perform rather than repeating multiple
user interactions.

      Many computer application programs are designed in a tree
structure (hierarchy) of menus where the user is introduced to a main
menu and given choices to select an option which then takes the user
to a lower-level menu (see Figure 1).  Along the path to the
lower-level menu, a dialog occurs where the computer program asks the
end user to select or key information needed by these lower-level
functions.

      In Figure 1, suppose that the user would like to execute a
function available from Menu F008.  This requires interacting with
the computer program to step through menus F003 and F007 to determine
the path the user wants to take and to solicit any information needed
to perform those functions available in Menu F008.

      If the user repeatedly performs the same function on Menu F008
using the same inputs, the navigation through menus F003 and F007
becomes an annoyance.  This irritation can be eliminated by providing
an option in the lower-level menus to create a "shortcut" definition
to return to the lower-level menu using the current routing
information (hierarchical path) and any context data the user has
keyed along the way.  The shortcut is defined by two very key things.
The first is the destinati...