Browse Prior Art Database

Air-Cooled Heat Pipe for Power Supplies

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000101520D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 2 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Baxter, DH: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes the use of the pipes to convey heat from power- to air-cooled fins remote from the cooled power supply. This is in place of using water-cooled cold plates and is especially useful in computer systems where, if the power supplies can be air cooled, then the coolant exchanger can be eliminated and the mainframe can be placed in a room without a water supply for cooling.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 92% of the total text.

Air-Cooled Heat Pipe for Power Supplies

       This article describes the use of the pipes to convey
heat from power- to air-cooled fins remote from the cooled power
supply.  This is in place of using water-cooled cold plates and is
especially useful in computer systems where, if the power supplies
can be air cooled, then the coolant exchanger can be eliminated and
the mainframe can be placed in a room without a water supply for
cooling.

      Figs. 1 and 2 show the usual cold plate replaced with a
spreader plate 10 with imbedded heat pipes 12.  The evaporator
portion of the heat pipe 12 is attached to the spreader plate 10 by
press fitting or clamping.  (Pressed fitting is preferred as the
interface resistance between the heat pipe and the spreader plate is
less.)  The condensing end of the heat pipes 10 has fins 14 attached
to it. Airflow 16 is forced across the fins to provide the cooling.
The cooling fluid in the heat pipes 12 can be water or, for very high
power densities, ammonia.  The cooling fluid used with the heat pipe
is determined from the power density and thermal resistance required.

      This cooling scheme can allow for rack mounting as shown in
Fig.  2.  Note that there is a separate cooling area 18 away from the
power supplies 20 being cooled.  Air need not be forced over the
supplies, thus eliminating difficult ducting of the air and reducing
acoustic problems and also providing a lower pressure drop (which, in
turn, reduces the si...