Browse Prior Art Database

Controlling Dialog Flow Through Cursor Sensitivity in Tabular Reports

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000101647D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 2 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Blase, R: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a decision-making aid for using cursor-sensitive control to minimize the amount of training required for a user to extract information from a computer system. The system detects the location of the cursor on a display screen of computer-generated information when the user generates an interrupt by pressing a mouse button, hot key, function key, or enter key. A new display is then built based upon: the location of the cursor the information displayed in the area where the cursor was located a comparison of the information displayed in the area where the cursor was located with other information presented on the display screen.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Controlling Dialog Flow Through Cursor Sensitivity in Tabular Reports

       Disclosed is a decision-making aid for using
cursor-sensitive control to minimize the amount of training required
for a user to extract information from a computer system.  The system
detects the location of the cursor on a display screen of
computer-generated information when the user generates an interrupt
by pressing a mouse button, hot key, function key, or enter key.  A
new display is then built based upon:
      the location of the cursor
      the information displayed in the area where the cursor
      was located
      a comparison of the information displayed in the area
      where the cursor was located with other information
      presented on the display screen.

      In a 'traditional' screen-based computer application in which
the user is requesting information from a computer, a single computer
display does not always contain sufficient information to satisfy the
needs of the user.  Instead, the user might analyze a table of
information, and request additional computer information by entering
appropriate commands.

      In order to perform this task, the user must first decide what
additional information is required. Subsequently, the user must
construct an appropriate command to request the information.  This
requires two skills:
      the user must know what information is needed
      the user must know how to ask for this information. Learning
these skills takes time.  Furthermore, command generation and input
is an error-prone process...