Browse Prior Art Database

Network-Based Compute Servers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000101649D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 3 page(s) / 110K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lackritz, NM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The PC-DOS operating system for the IBM Personal Computer does not provide for multi-tasking and allows 640 Kilobytes for its real address space. However, this method provides a multi-processor environment for application execution based on a local area networking (LAN) environment. This solution allows a single user to access as many concurrent applications as can be supported by the underlying physical network implementation medium, each of which has a separate 640K address space to itself. Furthermore, applications do not need modification to run in this environment.

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Network-Based Compute Servers

       The PC-DOS operating system for the IBM Personal Computer
does not provide for multi-tasking and allows 640 Kilobytes for its
real address space. However, this method provides a multi-processor
environment for application execution based on a local area
networking (LAN) environment.  This solution allows a single user to
access as many concurrent applications as can be supported by the
underlying physical network implementation medium, each of which has
a separate 640K address space to itself.  Furthermore, applications
do not need modification to run in this environment.

      The method assumes an environment of networked PCs. The LAN
environment provided by the system consists of a combination of
end-user workstations, remote compute servers, and a single DISPATCH
server, as shown in the figure.

      The procedure for making use of the environment is as follows:
An end-user desiring to access a remote computer server PC
establishes a network session with DISPATCH (the DISPATCH machine is
known to all other PCs in the LAN) and requests a compute server from
it.  DISPATCH checks its Server Allocation Table (SAT) to derive the
name of an unused server machine.  The name is returned to the
end-user workstation, its entry in the SAT marked as being utilized,
and the sessions between the end-user workstation and DISPATCH are
dropped.

      Next, the end-user workstation uses the name returned to it by
DISPATCH to establish a network session with the given server
machine.

      Once this session is established, the server machine begins to
operate in a mode where it assumes that all network communication
over the established session make use of the Emulation Datastream
(EDS).  This datastream encodes incoming keystrokes and outgoing
screen results into EDS packets transferred between the end-user
workstation and its connected server.  At this point, the end-user
can make use of the remote server from his desktop just as if his
keyboard and screen were directly attached to that server. The
end-user can also establish multiple sessions with servers and use a
screen management facility, described below, to switch among them.

      The encoding into EDS format takes place in a manner which is
transparent to the application running on the server machine, hence
the high degree of compatibility with existing, "ill-behaved"
applications (e.g., IBM's Personal Editor I).  Because of the
incremental nature of t...