Browse Prior Art Database

Frame-Based Representation of VLSI Functions in a Knowledge Base

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000101656D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 2 page(s) / 79K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Barrett, KL: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is a concept to codify the relationship of all functions of a VLSI chip in a knowledge base for the purpose of generating test cases in KEE* environment. In order to build test cases, the program (called IVGEN) needs a list of all available functions of a chip, the relationship between these functions, and how to test each function. This invention involves the frame-based representation of these functions.

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Frame-Based Representation of VLSI Functions in a Knowledge Base

       Disclosed is a concept to codify the relationship of all
functions of a VLSI chip in a knowledge base for the purpose of
generating test cases in KEE* environment.  In order to build test
cases, the program (called IVGEN) needs a list of all available
functions of a chip, the relationship between these functions, and
how to test each function.  This invention involves the frame-based
representation of these functions.

      Frames are widely used in AI for knowledge representation. A
frame is a tree-like structure that starts with a few nodes which are
class units, called the root nodes and branches to other nodes
(called the internal nodes) repeatedly to end in the leaf nodes.  The
frame-based representation allows the grouping of objects into
classes. Two units connected by a link have parent-child
relationship.  The units that are closer to the root are the
ancestors of the units that are closer to the leaves, and,
conversely, the ones that are closer to the leaves are the
descendants of the others.  One unit can have more than one parent.
Two units that have the same parent are siblings that inherit common
information from the parents.

      Each unit has some properties attached to it via slots.
Own-slots are properties of that unit and only that unit, similar to
local variables in procedural programs. Member-slots are properties
to be shared by all descendants of that unit.  This inheritance
property reduces programming effort since a program attached at a
node, in its member slot, will instantly be part of all of its
descendants. ...