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Self-Contained Dynamic Switch With Extension Capability to Large Switches

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000101680D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 3 page(s) / 107K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Eustace, R: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method to create large fiber-optic-based dynamic switches from small, self-contained switches by introducing an 'external matrix array' which provides connectivity between ports on different self-contained switches plus a shared memory, containing the current status of all crosspoint connections. The shared memory is then utilized by each local matrix controller to establish port connections on the internal or external matrix arrays.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Self-Contained Dynamic Switch With Extension Capability to Large Switches

       Disclosed is a method to create large fiber-optic-based
dynamic switches from small, self-contained switches by introducing
an 'external matrix array' which provides connectivity between ports
on different self-contained switches plus a shared memory, containing
the current status of all crosspoint connections. The shared memory
is then utilized by each local matrix controller to establish port
connections on the internal or external matrix arrays.

      A basic structure of a fiber-optic-based dynamic switch has
been described (1,2).  The referenced approach is consistent with
modest VLSI complexity and provides expandability by adding array
chips and chips containing port adapter functions (assuming the basic
matrix controller would be able to handle the maximum size matrix).
The essence of this disclosure is defining a functional partition
which when implemented as a single entity, is a fully operational
dynamic switch of a limited number of ports and adding additional,
similar entities, becomes a larger switch of corresponding greater
number of ports. The only additional entity utilized in all
configurations is a common memory. This common memory can be
contained on one chip for the largest switch anticipated.

      Fig. 1 illustrates details of the basic entity, the
self-contained switch and Fig. 2 illustrates the interconnect of
multiple self-contained switches and the common memory. VLSI density
will determine the number of ports on the self-contained switch if
the design is to be contained on a chip. However, the concept of a
self-contained switch does not require all the functions to be on one
chip.

      The internal matrix enables non-blocking interconnect between
any two ports on the self-contained switch. The external matrix
enables the local ports to be connected to ports of other switc...