Browse Prior Art Database

Generalized Query Language for Query System Output

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000101691D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-16
Document File: 2 page(s) / 82K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Stump, P: AUTHOR

Abstract

Operating system output, especially formatted output of multiple lines or pages of system data and test, has programming problems: It is difficult and error-prone to code, update, and maintain a program of formatted output text. The spacing is tedious and the desired output is not easy to derive directly from the code. If there is no application programming interface to that data, customers will write their own, locking the output into compatibility problems if new data is added anywhere other than at the end of the output. Pages of data give the user too much information, where we assume they were interested in one subset, or an individual piece of the total data.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Generalized Query Language for Query System Output

       Operating system output, especially formatted output of
multiple lines or pages of system data and test, has programming
problems:
           It is difficult and error-prone to code, update, and
maintain a program of formatted output text.  The spacing is tedious
and the desired output is not easy to derive directly from the code.
           If there is no application programming interface to that
data, customers will write their own, locking the output into
compatibility problems if new data is added anywhere other than at
the end of the output.
           Pages of data give the user too much information, where we
assume they were interested in one subset, or an individual piece of
the total data.

      Generalized Query Language (GQL) is the definition of a Query
Language for programmers to use to transform internal data into a
desired formatted output for screen display. Rather than worrying
about how to get the output field to appear at the exact desired
location using PL/AS source statements, the programmer can define, in
general terms, the internal system data locations, and the desired
formatted output of that data and text.  The PL/AS compiler and the
GQL interpreter take care of the rest.

      The macro facility of a high-level language (PL/AS) is used in
conjunction with a specialized interpreter to produce "error-free"
object code, enhanced maintainability, flexibility, and reusability
for displaying output data passed internally via common control
blocks.

      Unique macros are used to define output formatting, i.e., field
types and lengths, output text, where to put the data in the text,
order of text lines, where in the passed data block to find the
output field, which report(s) to display this data/text in, unit
conversion (e.g., seconds to milliseconds), etc.  The source program
including these new macros is compiled.  Compile errors are
introduced by the new macros to point out incomplete or incorrect
data/text manipulation.  A successful macro-phase compile produces a
series of PL/AS Declare statements.  At run time, the new GQL
interpreter (written PL/AS) is called to...