Browse Prior Art Database

Thermal Enhancement for a Printed Wiring Board, Thermal Finger Pad

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000101943D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cumm, KR: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

With the ever-increasing power dissipations found in today's conductively cooled electronic circuit packages, there is a growing need to enhance the heat transfer path through printed wiring boards. Currently, surface mount components must dissipate their heat through the relatively low conductivity layers of the printed wiring board to the heat sink frame on the opposite side. The disclosed thermal finger pad provides thermal enhancement to a printed circuit board by providing a continuous high conductivity path through the board. This disclosure takes a historically convective cooling device and uses it as a conductive cooling device.

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Thermal Enhancement for a Printed Wiring Board, Thermal Finger Pad

       With the ever-increasing power dissipations found in
today's conductively cooled electronic circuit packages, there is a
growing need to enhance the heat transfer path through printed wiring
boards.  Currently, surface mount components must dissipate their
heat through the relatively low conductivity layers of the printed
wiring board to the heat sink frame on the opposite side.  The
disclosed thermal finger pad provides thermal enhancement to a
printed circuit board by providing a continuous high conductivity
path through the board.  This disclosure takes a historically
convective cooling device and uses it as a conductive cooling device.

      The thermal finger pad 1, shown in the figure, consists of a
highly thermal conductive material (e.g., copper, 6101-T6 aluminum)
shaped to resemble a plate with pins protruding from one side.  The
thermal finger pad is soldered into the printed wiring board 2 as
shown.  The board is then bonded to the heat sink frame 3, and the
component 4 is, in turn, bonded to the heat sink frame 3, and the
component 4 is, in turn, bonded to the exposed flat surface of the
thermal finger pad.  This provides a continuous conduction heat
transfer path from the component case through the printed wiring
board to the heat sink frame.

      The thermal finger pad plate and pins can vary in size,
thickness and material to match the printed wiring board's plated...