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Browse Prior Art Database

Spherical LCD Display

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000101952D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Becker, CH: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is a spherical LCD display which uses a matrix of small LCDs in a geodesic grid pattern. With this display, applications including maps of the world, spacecraft trajectories, airline routes, etc., can be projected without distortion.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Spherical LCD Display

       Disclosed is a spherical LCD display which uses a matrix
of small LCDs in a geodesic grid pattern.  With this display,
applications including maps of the world, spacecraft trajectories,
airline routes, etc., can be projected without distortion.

      Referring to the figure, a spherical display 1 having a base 2
at the bottom is shown.  Any wiring required would run up through the
base 2.  The sphere 2 is comprised of parallelogram LCD units 3.  The
parallelograms are not all exactly the same size and shape, but
rather are dimensioned to fit together to form a unit as close to a
sphere as practical with minimal gaps between units.  Flexible cables
from each LCD parallelogram unit are attached to the base 2.

      Infrared links to a host computer increase the usability of the
spherical display.  The infrared receiver can be mounted at a pole.
With this wireless embodiment, one could physically spin the sphere 2
to look at every side.  In a non-infrared version, power can be run
into the sphere 2 through the base using a commercially available
rotating linkage.

      Alternatively, the sphere can be stationary, but the image
displayed can be rotated across the face.