Browse Prior Art Database

Integrated Sideplate Construction for Multiple Logic Cages

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000101970D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 4 page(s) / 129K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Corfits, WD: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

When mounting conventional logic cages back to back (with either a shared or two separate backplanes) the use of two discrete and separate cages (one such cage is shown in Fig. 1) poses a number of problems. In Fig. 1, logic cage 1 is comprised of top and bottom castings 2 which provide guiding and location for covered logic cards 10 that plug to electronic backplane 3. The assembly is tied together by sheet metal side plates 4 which provide rigidity and locate castings 2 and backplane 3 in the correct position with respect to one another. Cage 1 is shown assembled in the inset to Fig. 1. When two cages are assembled back to back, structural problems with rigidity may result creating difficulty in an environment where shock and vibration occur.

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Integrated Sideplate Construction for Multiple Logic Cages

       When mounting conventional logic cages back to back (with
either a shared or two separate backplanes) the use of two discrete
and separate cages (one such cage is shown in Fig. 1) poses a number
of problems.  In Fig. 1, logic cage 1 is comprised of top and bottom
castings 2 which provide guiding and location for covered logic cards
10 that plug to electronic backplane 3.  The assembly is tied
together by sheet metal side plates 4 which provide rigidity and
locate castings 2 and backplane 3 in the correct position with
respect to one another.  Cage 1 is shown assembled in the inset to
Fig. 1.  When two cages are assembled back to back, structural
problems with rigidity may result creating difficulty in an
environment where shock and vibration occur.  A more difficult
problem is the alignment of the two cages with respect to one
another, particularly when both cages share the same backplane.  The
number of parts and fasteners is also excessive.  Fig. 2 shows
methods of fastening and aligning two logic cages using their
sideplates as the primary joining means.  Only the cage sideplates
are shown in Fig. 2.

      The solution to these problems lies in the design shown in Fig.
3.  Here, a double sided logic cage 20 is comprised (as before) of
top and bottom cage castings 2 and a double sided backplane card
(plus attendant stiffeners and shields) 3 with the assembly tied
together with single piece (integral) sheet metal sideplates 25 that
serve to both rigidize the resultant logic cage and provide exact
alignment between the front 21 and back 22 logic cages and their
shared backplane card 3.  An assembled cage is shown in the inset to
Fig. 3.  By removing the assembly joint between the front and back
cages, rigidity is greatly increased and slippage at fastener points
(refer to Fig. 2) is eliminated, producing an extremely rigid
construction that will maintain the manufactured location of the two
cages relative to the backplane under adverse conditions...