Browse Prior Art Database

Fiber-Optic Splice Housing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102035D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 78K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kostenko, WP: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a strong, reusable, compact splice housing for duplex (or n-plex) fiber-optic cable that can be quickly and easily installed in the field without special tools or skills.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Fiber-Optic Splice Housing

       Disclosed is a strong, reusable, compact splice housing
for duplex (or n-plex) fiber-optic cable that can be quickly and
easily installed in the field without special tools or skills.

      An important application of fiber-optic splices is in field
cable repair or installation (i.e., the repair of severed cables, the
attachment of patch jumpers that are necessary when incompatible
connectors exist or connector installation after a cable is pulled
through conduit, etc.). These applications require splice physical
protection and isolation from external stresses in a package that is
easy to assemble and small enough so as not to interfere with cable
routing densities.

      The unique design of the fiber-optic splice housing (FOSH)
cavity (see the figure) provides two important functions.  The
retention lip holds the splices and connecting coated fibers in place
during assembly.  Once the fibers are tucked under the lip, the
natural springiness of the coated fibers keeps them in place and
allows them to naturally float to the minimum stress condition during
assembly and external stress conditions.  In addition, the dimensions
of the cavity are such that any coated fiber length from the splice
to the cable jacket greater than some minimum (2 inches for the
example in the figure) can be contained by serpentining and/or
looping the fiber without violating the minimum reliable bend radius.
This allows uneven lengths of spliced fiber and a number of "splice
attempts" to be made on the multiple fibers in the cable.

      There...