Browse Prior Art Database

Utilizing Optical Lithography in the Sub-Micron Dimensional Regime

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102048D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Aboelfotoh, MO: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A technique is described whereby the applicability of optical lithography is extended down into the sub-micron dimensional regime, on the order of 0.1 mm. A semiconductor fabrication method is described based on using near-field optical microscopy, with tunnel-distance regulation, to obtain sub-micron dimensions.

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Utilizing Optical Lithography in the Sub-Micron Dimensional Regime

       A technique is described whereby the applicability of
optical lithography is extended down into the sub-micron dimensional
regime, on the order of 0.1 mm.  A semiconductor fabrication method
is described based on using near-field optical microscopy, with
tunnel-distance regulation, to obtain sub-micron dimensions.

      In prior art, electron-beam lithography has been used for
sub-micron dimensional semiconductor device fabrication.  However,
there exists a potential disadvantage in that damage can be induced
by electron-beam exposure, resulting in adverse device electrical
characteristics.  The concept described herein implements device
fabrication techniques which utilize optical lithography to overcome
the disadvantages.

      In the fabrication of devices for use in the sub-micron
dimensional regime, silicon layer 4, as shown in Fig. 1, is first
deposited to a thickness of 1000 angstroms over a photoresist layer
2, having a thickness of two to three microns.  A second photoresist
layer 6 is then deposited to a thickness of 1000 to 2000 angstroms
over silicon layer 4. This is followed by the deposition of a thin
layer of gold 8, or other conductive material, to a thickness of 100
angstroms over the photoresist layer 6.  This ensures good electrical
conductivity needed for distance regulation.

      As is generally practiced in near-field optical microscopy,
microscopic prot...