Browse Prior Art Database

Reworkable Transition for Connectors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102049D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Campbell, JS: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a technique that enables rework of otherwise non-reworkable contact pads used in a connector system. Current technology allows the use of dense arrays of non-reworkable contacts on circuit boards. These contacts cannot be removed or replated if they become damaged, which results in the card or board being scrapped, which can be very expensive.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Reworkable Transition for Connectors

       Disclosed is a technique that enables rework of otherwise
non-reworkable contact pads used in a connector system. Current
technology allows the use of dense arrays of non-reworkable contacts
on circuit boards.  These contacts cannot be removed or replated if
they become damaged, which results in the card or board being
scrapped, which can be very expensive.

      The invention consists of a transition piece (which can be
flexible or rigid) that has the non-reworkable contacts on one side,
and the other side is such that it can be attached to the card,
board, or component in a way that is conductive to rework.  The
non-reworkable contacts are electrically connected to the opposite
side of the transition piece with vias or the like.

      In Fig. 1 the non-reworkable contacts 1 are shown plated onto a
transition piece 2 which is attached to a card, board, or component
3.  The process by which the transition piece is attached to the
card, board, or component is of a reworkable nature such as, but not
limited to, solder.

      In one embodiment (see Fig. 2) the non-reworkable contacts 1
are plated to the transition piece 2 which is then attached to the
board 3 by a reworkable means.  The connector 4 can then interface
with the contacts on the transition piece.

      In Fig. 3 two transition pieces 2 are being used in a modular
concept to extend the number of I/O's.