Browse Prior Art Database

Increasing Operator Panel Function in Existing Printers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102173D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hucaby, DR: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a circuit for increasing the available number of switches on a printer's operator panel. The enhanced panel needs no extra signals to connect with the central microprocessor, allowing the panel to be used in new printers and also retrofitted into existing printers alike.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 65% of the total text.

Increasing Operator Panel Function in Existing Printers

       Disclosed is a circuit for increasing the available
number of switches on a printer's operator panel.  The enhanced panel
needs no extra signals to connect with the central microprocessor,
allowing the panel to be used in new printers and also retrofitted
into existing printers alike.

      Many printers are designed with "remote" operator panel
hardware, or a circuit board that is mounted separate from the main
printer board.  The operator panel is connected to the main board by
a multi- conductor cable or connector. The cost of the operator panel
is impacted by the number of conductors in the connecting cable, so a
lesser number of connections is preferable.

      The signals going from the printer's CPU to the panel control
both indicator lights and monitor switch activity. A serial clock and
data line pass data to a shift register on the op-panel, where the
data is stored and output to many LEDs at one time. Usually, printers
have one signal for each switch on the panel, as shown in the left
side of the figure.  The number of switches could be doubled for
increased functionality, but would require six signals from the panel
to the main circuit board, for switches alone.

      The enhanced operator panel provides double the number of
switches than signals by dividing the switches up into two rows.  The
rows are connected in a wire-OR fashion, such that one switch from
each row is conne...