Browse Prior Art Database

Connector Docking

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102209D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 4 page(s) / 178K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Corfits, WD: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

Described is a connector docking design which provides for: - remote alignment of multiple connector sets, - shortest possible connection between two separate electronic boxes, - manual insertion of multiple connectors that have high insertion loads, - guarantee of full connector insertion remote from the connectors, - positive retention of mated connectors, and - internal connections between two boxes; the connecting hardware is attached to one box, but once the connections are made, the hard ware becomes part of the second box.

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Connector Docking

       Described is a connector docking design which provides
for:
-  remote alignment of multiple connector sets,
-  shortest possible connection between two separate electronic
boxes,
-  manual insertion of multiple connectors that have high insertion
loads,
-  guarantee of full connector insertion remote from the connectors,
-  positive retention of mated connectors, and
-  internal connections between two boxes; the connecting hardware is
attached to one box, but once the connections are made, the hard
ware becomes part of the second box.

      The parts shown in Fig. 1 comprise the Connector Docking
Design.  The purpose of the parts is to provide a means of
electrically interconnecting

boxes

7

and 8.  Fig. 1 shows how the
major pieces are assembled in order to aid in understanding the
function of the Connector Docking Design concept.

      The standoff 10, backpanel 11, spacer 12, rear EMC shield 13,
and alignment bracket 14 are all screwed together and are centrally
located in electronic box 8.  The retainer plates 15, connector block
16, connectors 20, drive screw 17, and tray 18 are mounted centrally
and underneath electronic box 7.

      The central backpanel 11 of box 8 has one half of the mating
connectors 20 between the boxes mounted directly on the board.  The
other half of the mating connectors 21 are mounted to connector block
16 and retained in place with retainers 15. The connector cables are
then hard-wired into box 7.

      The connection is made by first installing box 8 in rack 6.
Box 7 is then installed in rack 6.  Then drive rod 17 is pushed
rearward, causing the connector block 16 with its alignment holes to
engage the alignment pins of the alignment bracket 14.  This
automatically engages the connector block 16 as part of box 8 and
moves the connectors into position for final engagement.  Rotation of
the rod 17 causes the rod 17 to screw into the standoff 10, thus
pulling the connector block and connectors towards the backpanel and
seating the connectors.

      The connector block 16 can be made to accommodate different
connector types in different mounting locations to allow a mix of
connector types in order to optimize performance or function between
the boxes.  This is simply done by changing the connector mounting
pocket depth and width to accommodate the connector's physical size.

      Tray 18 serves to hold the connector docking hardware in an
approximate position for later connector engagement, and to protect
the hardware if box 7 is placed down on a horizontal surface.

      The tray 18 floats relative to box 7.  This allows it to
compensate for mounting tolerances in all three axes, both laterally
and rotationally, and for the relative motion between the boxes
induced by shipping or operational shock and/or vibration.

      The interconnect area is protected from electromagnetic
interference (EMI) to prevent radio wave signals fro...