Browse Prior Art Database

Three-Layer Window System for Visual Query

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102244D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 3 page(s) / 105K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Li, SG: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a three-layer window system that can keep the visible availability of the chosen objects and allow scrolling function work on some other objects. One of the common problems in visualized window applications is requiring that the user interact with a large number of objects. For example, the objects needed to be displayed in the primary window of a Visual Query may include 15 Table windows, New Column Window, Row Condition Window, Group By Window, Having Condition Window, Category Window and a number of modeless dialog boxes. It is too much to be viewable on the screen at the same time.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Three-Layer Window System for Visual Query

       Disclosed is a three-layer window system that can keep
the visible availability of the chosen objects and allow scrolling
function work on some other objects.  One of the common problems in
visualized window applications is requiring that the user interact
with a large number of objects.  For example, the objects needed to
be displayed in the primary window of a Visual Query may include 15
Table windows, New Column Window, Row Condition Window, Group By
Window, Having Condition Window, Category Window and a number of
modeless dialog boxes.  It is too much to be viewable on the screen
at the same time.  Although the user can vertically or horizontally
scroll the screen display to see the other objects which are
currently not on the viewable portion, the user will lose the visual
availability of some important objects while searching for the other
needed objects through scrolling operations.

      When the three-layer window system is applied, every window on
the screen is actually the overlap of three separate windows: the top
layer window, the middle layer window and the bottom layer window.
The three windows have exactly the same size at the same location
with the same control.  The three windows have the same action bar;
every item in the action bar works on the objects in all layers.
However, the scroll bar available for the users is the scroll bar of
the layer chosen to be scrollable.  In the screen display management,
the programmer can assign each object to a layer and choose one or
more layers to be scrollable.  Usually, the objects which are
required to be visually available all the time are assigned to the
top layer and the top layer is not chosen to be scrollable.  The
"on-top" relationship between objects can be described as:
      (1)  The objects in the top layer are on top of all the other
objects.
      (2)  The objects in the middle layer are on top of all the
objects in the bottom layer.
      (3)  The objects in the bottom layer are below all the other
objects.

      After a select operation, the "on-top" relationship among
objects will be changed as:
      (1)  If the selected object is an object X in the top layer,
then X becomes the top object in the top layer.  The "on-top"
relationships among all the other objects in the  middle and bottom
layers remain the same.
      (2)  If the selected object is an object X in the middle layer,
then X becomes the top object in the middle layer.  All objects in
top layer which were "on-top" of X are moved to the bottom layer and
placed as the top objects in the bottom layer.
      (3)  If the se...