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Mechanism for Eliminating Head-Tape Stiction in Magnetic Tape Drives

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102273D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Spong, J: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for eliminating head-tape startup stiction in a magnetic tape drive by vibrating the head beneath the tape to prevent the surfaces from adhering. The vibration is accomplished using the head servo actuator, which already exists in high track density tape drives. The approach therefore requires no additional hardware and minimal alternation of the drive.

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Mechanism for Eliminating Head-Tape Stiction in Magnetic Tape Drives

       Disclosed is a method for eliminating head-tape startup
stiction in a magnetic tape drive by vibrating the head beneath the
tape to prevent the surfaces from adhering.  The vibration is
accomplished using the head servo actuator, which already exists in
high track density tape drives.  The approach therefore requires no
additional hardware and minimal alternation of the drive.

      To evaluate the effectiveness of this approach, a simple tape
path was constructed, consisting of a supply spool, takeup spool, two
guide posts and the recording head. The head was mounted on a voice
coil actuator to provide a track-following servo.  Startup stiction
in the path was measured by attaching a strain gauge to the posts and
measuring the sudden torque exerted on the posts, due to a sudden
change in tape tension.  A spike in tension is the result of stick/
slip occurring on the tape path elements when the tape is started up
from rest.

      Stiction was measured as a function of frequency of head
vibration, and compared to the amount of stiction without the head in
the tape path.  The results are summarized in the figure.  The data
show that head-tape stiction is systematically reduced as the
frequency of vibration is increased.  At the highest frequencies
used, a 4x reduction in stiction is observed, compared to the
stationary head (0 Hz).  The results indicate that negligible amounts
o...