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Browse Prior Art Database

3-D Slider Graphical Object

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102279D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 3 page(s) / 112K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Appino, P: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a graphical object, a 3D slider (also called a "volumetric slider" in certain applications), that effectively controls three variables. The value of the three variables can be represented as a vector, a polyline, or a box depending on the application. The 3-D slider is well suited to color specification and the manipulation of viewing volumes in conjunction with volumetrically rendered data.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

3-D Slider Graphical Object

       Disclosed is a graphical object, a 3D slider (also called
a "volumetric slider" in certain applications), that effectively
controls three variables.  The value of the three variables can be
represented as a vector, a polyline, or a box depending on the
application.  The 3-D slider is well suited to color specification
and the manipulation of viewing volumes in conjunction with
volumetrically rendered data.

      In the primary embodiment, the icon can be used to control and
feed back information on what is called the "viewing volume" in many
3-D graphical applications.  The user points and can move a shaded
rectangular region within the starting default viewing volume, as
shown in Fig. 1. This resembles a box within a box on the graphics
screen. As background, a slider is a graphical object that controls
the value of a variable within a continuous range.  The value of the
variable is changed by using a pointing device, usually a mouse, to
move a slider bar right or left.  The graphical components of a
slider include a label, a rectangle encompassing the range of the
variable, and a graphical object representing the current value of
the variable (a shaded rectangle or bar).

      The variable axes for the 3-D slider can be labeled X, Y, and
Z, as shown in Fig. 2.  The orientation of the axes can be
interactively changed.  Four controls, such as four keys on the
keyboard or a mouse, can be used to control the 3-D position of the
axes (a), allowing for clockwise spin (b), counter-clockwise spin
(c), clockwise rotation, and counter-clockwise rotation (d).  This is
similar to the movement of a globe, where spin is movement around the
north and south pole (z) and rotation is tilting of the globe on the
side pivots.

      The values of the variables controlled by the 3-D slider can be
graphically represented as a vector, a polyline, or a box.  Assume
the minumum value for X, Y, and Z is (0,0,0) and the current value is
(x,y,z).  The point (x,y,z) can be shown as a vector drawn from (0,0,
0) to (x,y,z) with an arrow at the end to indicate direction. (x,y,z)
also can be represented as a polyline consisting of the line segments
(0,0,0) to (x,0,0), (x,0,0) to (x,y,0) and (x,y,0) to (x,y,z).  The
line segments should have greater thickness than the axes so they
stand out to the user.  Fig. 3 shows the polyline representation of
x=1, y=2, and z=3 for the four positions a-d in Fig. 2, respectively.
T...