Browse Prior Art Database

Use of Controlled Energy Pulses for Ink-Thin Film Ribbon Printing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102285D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 63K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

McGarry, WP: AUTHOR

Abstract

The described circuit meters out energy in the form of pulses to a laminated thin-film ribbon made up of three layers. The print contact conducts a pulse of energy to a conductive layer. This causes the temperature of that layer to rise. The heat from this action conducts through the second layer, a non-conductive (electrically) plastic to which the third layer is bonded. This third layer is an ink film in solid form which, when heated, flows and is transferred to a paper that is to be printed. Normally this task is done using a constant current or voltage source. When the conductive film is non-linear and very temperature sensitive, it is difficult to control the energy delivered to the conductive film.

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Use of Controlled Energy Pulses for Ink-Thin Film Ribbon Printing

       The described circuit meters out energy in the form of
pulses to a laminated thin-film ribbon made up of three layers.  The
print contact conducts a pulse of energy to a conductive layer.  This
causes the temperature of that layer to rise.  The heat from this
action conducts through the second layer, a non-conductive
(electrically) plastic to which the third layer is bonded.  This
third layer is an ink film in solid form which, when heated, flows
and is transferred to a paper that is to be printed.  Normally this
task is done using a constant current or voltage source. When the
conductive film is non-linear and very temperature sensitive, it is
difficult to control the energy delivered to the conductive film.
Since the quality of the print depends on melting a uniform quantity
of ink, it follows that the energy should be controlled directly to
insure the required uniformity.  This requires the integration of the
instantaneous power over some time interval t.
      That is, the energy contained in a pulse is given by
                  t
           E(t) = ? i(t) v(t) dt
                  0
This is a very difficult task to perform because the i(t) and the
v(t) are very erratic with time.

      The present circuit provides the desired E(t) and avoids the
nasty measurement of i(t), v(t) and the required product integration.

      Consider...