Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Lamination Support

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102359D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Engwall, M: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a stator lamination support post for electric motors, where the post also serves as a heat transfer device.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 67% of the total text.

Lamination Support

       Disclosed is a stator lamination support post for
electric motors, where the post also serves as a heat transfer
device.

      A significant portion of the heat generated in windings and
laminations in the assembly of electric motors is conducted axially
in the center lamination support post. The heat must first be
transferred from the laminations to the post, requiring a large
interface surface between laminations and post to effectively utilize
a material with high heat conductivity.  Then the heat is conducted
axially, calling for a large cross-sectional area of the post.

      The prior art (Fig. 1) gives evidence mainly of support posts
having a circular cross section; occasionally a flat face is created
to serve as a registration for the laminations.

      Both increased interface surface area and increased
cross-sectional area can be accomplished by using a post
cross-sectional geometry of the shape shown in Fig. 2; the additional
area taken from the laminations is located in portions of the latter
where the magnetic flux density is low, therefore not affecting the
motor efficiency appreciably.  In comparing the length of the
boundary curve between laminations and post in the two cases of
conventional (Fig. 1) and fluted geometry (Fig. 2), it is also seen
that the latter is greatly increased, creating a low-resistance
conduction path for heat being transferred from laminations to post.

      The post of Fig. 2 also...