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Acoustically Quiet Motor Design

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102370D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 1 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Young, JT: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a method of reducing lamination resonance in electric motors by increasing the stiffness of the rotor lamination stack with consequent reduction of acoustic noise. Adhesive is used to bond laminations both to each other and to the shaft. The resulting assembly is quick to produce, requires minimal tooling, dimensionally is very accurate (position of stator effects axial vibration and subsequent noise), and produces a component that is completely integral, and free from lamination vibration.

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Acoustically Quiet Motor Design

       This article describes a method of reducing lamination
resonance in electric motors by increasing the stiffness of the rotor
lamination stack with consequent reduction of acoustic noise.
Adhesive is used to bond laminations both to each other and to the
shaft.  The resulting assembly is quick to produce, requires minimal
tooling, dimensionally is very accurate (position of stator effects
axial vibration and subsequent noise), and produces a component that
is completely integral, and free from lamination vibration.

      Referring to the figure, clean laminations 1 are slid over the
motor shaft 2 forming a stack 3 which is positioned relative to the
shaft datum.  While accurately located and held, a low viscosity
adhesive is wicked into the gap 4 between the laminations 1 and the
shaft 2.  When the adhesive is visible around the periphery 5 of the
laminations, the stack of laminations 3 is fully clamped and the
adhesive cured.  This technique can be enhanced by the addition of
grooves in the shaft or notches in the laminations to improve
adhesive distribution.  A noise reduction of 15 dB has been achieved
compared with the noise of the same motor before implementing this
process.