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Optical Detection of Printed/Handwritten Lines for Passbook Processing Devices Based On Image Sharpness Evaluation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102396D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 1 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Heilmann, S: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a method of in-situ detecting printed or handwritten lines in passbooks or other documents even under adverse conditions connected with poor print quality, stains, etc.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 58% of the total text.

Optical Detection of Printed/Handwritten Lines for Passbook Processing Devices Based On Image Sharpness Evaluation

       This article describes a method of in-situ detecting
printed or handwritten lines in passbooks or other documents even
under adverse conditions connected with poor print quality, stains,
etc.

      Self-service units for banking, such as cash dispensers and
automatic teller machines, are capable of processing passbooks with
magnetic stripes or machine or handwritten lines.  The customer is
thus able to deposit and withdraw money or to ask for a statement of
account.

      Conventional processing equipment for passbooks with printed or
handwritten lines comprise optical line and page finders.  The read
head consists of an illumination source and an optical sensor
(phototransistor, photodiode), supplying data on how much light is
reflected by the respective position sensed.  For line sensing, only
black-white features are evaluated.  This approach is liable to
errors and fails, for example, where the sensed document is stained
or the print/background contrast is poor.  It also fails to detect
whether a weakly printed line is attributable to poor ribbon quality
or whether the ink has been absorbed by the paper (shine-through
effect).

      The method described in this article operates on the basis that
additional data on the physical nature of print are derivable at an
increased resolution of the sensor. This increased resolution is...