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Reconciliation of Shadowed Mail Items With Master

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102409D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 95K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kasiraj, C: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This article describes a method to reconcile shadowed mail items with the server-based mail containers. This concept allows users to readily and quickly access the mail container, provides a disconnected workstation support, and enables the user to share mail with others. (Image Omitted)

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Reconciliation of Shadowed Mail Items With Master

       This article describes a method to reconcile shadowed
mail items with the server-based mail containers.  This concept
allows users to readily and quickly access the mail container,
provides a disconnected workstation support, and enables the user to
share mail with others.

                            (Image Omitted)

      The major purpose of a server-based mail container is to
provide sharing of one's mail, use of server's resource, and to
maximize workstation capabilities via cooperative processing.  To
provide these requirements and also to provide a full functional
disconnected workstation, the shared server-based mail-basket data
integrity must not be jeopardized.

      On the Server, the major elements of mail are separated into
"objects" and "properties" and are stored separately. The object is
the content of mail body which may be a note or a document.  The
properties of an object are the description, such as subject,
document name, etc.  Each distribution that is sent from one user to
another is stored on the server with an unique distribution entry
identifier. A distribution contains a distribution header, one or
more objects with corresponding properties.  Each object is stored
separately and is assigned an unique identifier called Mail Assigned
Document Name (MADN).

      On the workstation, the user first views the mail container,
which provides the distribution header information like sender,
subject, etc.  The user then requests the distribution item to be
viewed.  Then the object is accessed and retrieved for display.  On a
server based connection, the above scenario is simple.  Information
is accessed and retrieved from the Server on needed basis. When the
information, however, is shadowed on the workstation, the user
requested information must be retrieved locally if available.

      An entry list of distribution is maintained on the workstation
and is periodically reconciled with the Server...