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Conductive Polyaniline-Polystyrene Sulfonic Acid Copolymer Coating Solution

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102422D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 1 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Linde, HG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

To allow dip, spin, or spray application of polyaniline-polystyrene sulfonic acid material to be an electrically conductive coating, the conductive material is first dissolved in a dilute aqueous amine, e.g., ammonium hydroxide solution, rendering the material non-conductive (purple). After application and evaporation of solvents, water and ammonia, the material again becomes conductive (green).

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Conductive Polyaniline-Polystyrene Sulfonic Acid Copolymer Coating Solution

       To allow dip, spin, or spray application of
polyaniline-polystyrene sulfonic acid material to be an electrically
conductive coating, the conductive material is first dissolved in a
dilute aqueous amine, e.g., ammonium hydroxide solution, rendering
the material non-conductive (purple).  After application and
evaporation of solvents, water and ammonia, the material again
becomes conductive (green).

      Polyaniline-polystyrene sulfonic acid material is formed by
oxidative polymerization of aniline in an aqueous solution of
polystyrene, sulfonic acid, and persulfate.  The conductive
precipitated copolymer blend is washed, and then dissolved in dilute
aqueous amine, e.g., ammonium hydroxide solution, which forms a
purple, non-conducting material in the liquid.

      Application of this liquid by dip, spray, or spin techniques
results in a purple coating that turns green and conductive when most
of the ammonia and water is evaporated by room temperature drying or
by baking.

      Electrical sheet resistivity of films prepared by this method
is controllable over the range of thousands to tens of ohms per
square by varying the ratio of polysulfonic acid to polyaniline.
Thus, films suitable for use as electrostatic shielding or as
components in integrated circuits may be created by relatively
inexpensive application processes.