Browse Prior Art Database

Transportable Component Personal Computer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102427D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kline, DW: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Portable computers, aside from their added expense, have traditionally had smaller, less readable displays than their office counterparts. Additionally, because of the weight involved, they have also traditionally been less equipped than their office counterparts. Disclosed is a lighter, more easily customized, system for transporting a personal computer without the added expense of a separate system. (Image Omitted)

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 56% of the total text.

Transportable Component Personal Computer

       Portable computers, aside from their added expense, have
traditionally had smaller, less readable displays than their office
counterparts.  Additionally, because of the weight involved, they
have also traditionally been less equipped than their office
counterparts. Disclosed is a lighter, more easily customized, system
for transporting a personal computer without the added expense of a
separate system.

                            (Image Omitted)

      The "transportable component", or alternately the "cartridge",
personal computer is a system of electronic cards and shells that
form office and travel personal computers.  There are at least two
shells that the user may use.  The first is the "office shell" as
seen in the figure. The office shell is a typical computer box with a
special motherboard in it.  The motherboard contains controller
circuitry for insertion and removal of the cartridges (cards) from
the connectors.  The connectors and cartridges contain circuitry to
identify the cards for insertion and removal.  This circuitry is
described in  *.

      Attached to the "office shell" are the typical input/output
devices that a user would normally purchase with a personal computer
including, but not limited to, a keyboard, a display, a printer.  All
of the items could be standard devices sold with other
non-"cartridge" systems.

      The second shell that the user cou...