Browse Prior Art Database

New Device for Measure Thin Film Stress And Adhesion

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102464D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 5 page(s) / 108K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chan, H: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

As the density of VLSI circuits continues to increase for decreasing design dimensions, different materials and unique structures are proposed in order to minimize signal path lengths. Material compatibility studies, such as adhesion and tensile stress, play an important role to address the reliability issue. The most common engineering techniques, such as peeling, indentation, abrasion and bending, only can provide a bulk measurement of the material properties. A technique (*) using a hollow device to determine the tensile stress of the thin film was recently reported. Although it reported the use of suspended thin film membranes on semiconductor substrates able to determine the residual tensile stress of the film, it is limited to net tensile stress of films of composite membranes.

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New Device for Measure Thin Film Stress And Adhesion

       As the density of VLSI circuits continues to increase for
decreasing design dimensions, different materials and unique
structures are proposed in order to minimize signal path lengths.
Material compatibility studies, such as adhesion and tensile stress,
play an important role to address the reliability issue.  The most
common engineering techniques, such as peeling, indentation, abrasion
and bending, only can provide a bulk measurement of the material
properties.  A technique (*) using a hollow device to determine the
tensile stress of the thin film was recently reported.  Although it
reported the use of suspended thin film membranes on semiconductor
substrates able to determine the residual tensile stress of the film,
it is limited to net tensile stress of films of composite membranes.

      The device disclosed herein not only is able to determine the
tensile stress directly from the load-deflection data of the single
thin film, but it is also able to measure the adhesion force and
energy of different composite films.  This invention utilizes the
integrity of microelectonic processing technology, including
lithography, etching, CVD, polymer and planarization, to fabricate
the hollow device.  The fabrication procedures require five masks set
to define the structure. Figs. 1 to 5 illustrate each lithographic
step and the details of the invention.

      Reference
(*)  Keith E. Crowe and Rosemary...