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Test Label Pattern for the On-line Label Generation Process

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102468D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 4 page(s) / 143K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Feenstra, DD: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The advent of a process for designing and manufacturing labels in an on-line, on-demand form has created a need to test the process at its various stages. This is particularly true in an environment where a multiplicity of printers, substrates, and label formats and sizes exist.

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Test Label Pattern for the On-line Label Generation Process

       The advent of a process for designing and manufacturing
labels in an on-line, on-demand form has created a need to test the
process at its various stages.  This is particularly true in an
environment where a multiplicity of printers, substrates, and label
formats and sizes exist.

      A test label has been devised that will allow the label
designer to test the processes of digitizing label images, converting
them to a releasable digital format, and transmitting them to
manufacturing.  This test label also provides features that test the
capability of the chosen printer and label substrate to produce
labels with readability and graphic or character resolution that meet
the quality standards required for production.  Additionally, the
test label provides a standard vehicle for ensuring that print
quality does not degrade over time.

      For reference, Fig. 1 shows the type of label that is currently
being printed on-line.  The label family includes variable elements
of graphics, text, and bar-coded fields. The test label is identical
in size to those shown in Fig. 1 and has the printed features shown
in Fig. 2 (neither figure is to scale).  The specific label format
and information may be changed, as necessary, to test attributes of
other labels with differing requirements.  The features of the
specific test label shown (and other optional features, not included
in the label in the drawing) are described below.
 1.  Two 3 of 9 bar codes, one printed horizontally and one printed
vertically.  These provide a test for bar-code readability and allow
the user to determine which direction the label should be printed
(the typical all-points-addressable printer, such as a QUIETWRITER*,
will print more readable bar codes in one direction).
 2.  An IBM logo.  There are strict legal requirements as to the
resolution of logos--the printed logo is used to determine if the
printer/substrate combination is capable of providing acceptable
quality.
 3.  Scaling information in the form of a series of exact size lines
with the actual length described in text. Some printers have
tolerance buildup problems in the dot spacing of their printed images
(both horizontally and vertically).  The scaling lines provide a mea-
sure of the ability of the printer to duplicate the size of the drawn
image.
 4.  A coordinate system start mark in the form of a printed "cross
hair" on the division between the label substrate and its release
paper carrier.  This mark is an easily visible indicator of the
ability of the printer carriage control to place sequential labels in
the same relative position; it also indicates variations in the
placement of individual labels on the substrate itself.
      5.  Printed graphics having the following attributes:
      -  A variety of printed edge types ranging from horizontal and
vertical to slanted and curved.  These provide a mea...