Browse Prior Art Database

Two-Layer Laser Deposition Scheme

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102525D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 1 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bindra, P: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Related to the evolving technologies referred to as Laser Metal Deposition, Laser Direct Write, or Laser Seed, this idea provides a means of depositing two or more subsequent layers of materials (i.e., an adhesion layer followed by a functional layer) onto surface by the use of specially selected organometallic compounds which selectively deposit when exposed to laser beams of different wavelengths or intensities.

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Two-Layer Laser Deposition Scheme

       Related to the evolving technologies referred to as Laser
Metal Deposition, Laser Direct Write, or Laser Seed, this idea
provides a means of depositing two or more subsequent layers of
materials (i.e., an adhesion layer followed by a functional layer)
onto surface by the use of specially selected organometallic
compounds which selectively deposit when exposed to laser beams of
different wavelengths or intensities.

      The deposition of a metal by controlled decomposition of an
organometallic compound by a laser is an active area of research and
development at this time.  One problem associated with this
technique, especially for packaging applications where copper is of
prime interest, is that copper, by itself, has poor adhesion to many
materials. Volatile organometallic copper compounds have been used to
deposit copper metal on surfaces where laser radiation is focused,
but practical applications have been limited due to this poor
adhesion.  In dry deposition processes, such as evaporation or
sputtering, which are commonly used in packaging applications (i.e.,
MC and Thin Films), an intermediate layer of some second material
(i.e., chromium) is often deposited to act as an adhesion promoter
between the copper and the substrate surface.  The ability to deposit
two or more layers of materials quickly, in the same chamber, while
maintaining mask or optics alignment, would expand the usefulness of
this dry laser depositi...