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Using a Sparse Object Grid for Discreet Relative Cursor Movement

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102574D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 74K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hambrick, GM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method to allow efficient, unambiguous movement within desktop environments that is controlled by the keyboard instead of a mouse. This latter method of movement is employed since it allows direct movement from the current position to the destination desired, usually in a single straight line motion of the mouse.

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Using a Sparse Object Grid for Discreet Relative Cursor Movement

       Disclosed is a method to allow efficient, unambiguous
movement within desktop environments that is controlled by the
keyboard instead of a mouse.  This latter method of movement is
employed since it allows direct movement from the current position to
the destination desired, usually in a single straight line motion of
the mouse.

      However, when keyboard controlled movement is required, it is
accomplished using keystroke(s) mapped to a directional function
(like up, down, left or right).  The distance function describes a
hypothetical grid system centered around the current cursor position.
Thus, the cursor always lies on an intersection, and movement causes
the cursor to go to the next intersection point in the direction
mapped.

      This method is highly inefficient, since it generally takes a
number of keystrokes to move the cursor to the desired position (see
Fig. 1), even in systems where the distance can be varied by "zoom"
functions.  What is needed is an alternate method when moving from
object-to-object rather than point-to-point.

      A distance algorithm could be employed to cause movement of the
cursor to the "nearest" object in the direction mapped.  A problem
with this approach is that a given arrangement of objects within the
desktop can create ambiguity.  Fig. 2 shows an example where one
object to the left of the cursor is farther but "more left" than
anoth...