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Full Mouse Emulation Using a Touch-Screen Monitor And a Stylus

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102592D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Flowers, DA: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Touch-screen monitors are becoming more prevalent, but limited application software is available. The large installed base of mouse applications makes mouse emulation a desirable touch-screen property. A stylus and software modification are described which allow a touch-screen monitor to exactly emulate a mouse.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 69% of the total text.

Full Mouse Emulation Using a Touch-Screen Monitor And a Stylus

       Touch-screen monitors are becoming more prevalent, but
limited application software is available.  The large installed base
of mouse applications makes mouse emulation a desirable touch-screen
property.  A stylus and software modification are described which
allow a touch-screen monitor to exactly emulate a mouse.

      There are two requirements for mouse emulation:
      1)   Stylus

      The stylus provides a convenient and comfortable means to
emulate the mouse buttons.  Refer to the figure for an example of
switch location on the stylus. In addition, the stylus has a tip
which is smaller than a user's finger, enabling the user to do more
detailed work.
      2)   Coordinate System Transformation

      A mouse reports changes in position only, not absolute
position.  In addition, the mouse can detect movement only when it is
in contact with a surface; if it is picked up, moved, and placed down
again, operation continues as if it had not been moved at all. In
contrast, a touch-screen reports the absolute position of a touch on
the screen.  To emulate a mouse, touch-screen software must report
changes in position from the point of initial contact with the
screen.  If the stylus is removed from the screen, moved and placed
on the screen again, subsequent movements are reported relative to
the new point of initial contact.

      The concept of adding a stylus t...