Browse Prior Art Database

Audio And Tactile Light-Emitting Diode Indicator Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102610D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

McLean, JG: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Described is a device which provides audio and tactile signals, enabling a user to monitor the readout of a light-emitting diode (LED) without visually observing the LED. The device is designed to be attached to LED readout indicators and to be used by operators where visual observations of a display are not practical, or to be used by visually impaired individuals.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 63% of the total text.

Audio And Tactile Light-Emitting Diode Indicator Device

       Described is a device which provides audio and tactile
signals, enabling a user to monitor the readout of a light-emitting
diode (LED) without visually observing the LED.  The device is
designed to be attached to LED readout indicators and to be used by
operators where visual observations of a display are not practical,
or to be used by visually impaired individuals.

      The concept involves a device that reads the state of LEDs and
translates that state into audio and/or tactile domains.  The device
enables the user to know the exact state of a LED without actually
viewing the LED.

      The device is designed to be activated when placed in close
proximity with a LED, as used in indicators of a computer system.  In
one use, the device can be attached to a user's finger enabling the
user to easily move the device from one LED to another.  This enables
multiple LEDs to be read with the same device.  An actuator, within
the device, transfers a tactile signal to the user's fingers when the
lighted LED is ON.  The actuator is typically a solenoid, or a small
electric motor.  A suction cup, containing a cadmium sulfide (CdS)
cell, can be attached to the user's finger. The rest of the
circuitry, including a battery, can be attached to the user's wrist,
so as to reduce the size and weight.

      The circuitry is shown in the figure.  It consists of power
supply 10, integrated circuit 11, c...