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Adopting Live Environment for Simulator Debug/Test

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000102640D
Original Publication Date: 1990-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-17
Document File: 2 page(s) / 69K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Corrigan, MJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A method is described for "adopting" a computer process environment from a real computer system into a simulator of the computer system for continued execution of the computer process.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Adopting Live Environment for Simulator Debug/Test

       A method is described for "adopting" a computer process
environment from a real computer system into a simulator of the
computer system for continued execution of the computer process.

      In order to allow testing to occur on a private simulator (on a
personal workstation, for instance) so as not to disrupt other users
and allow the benefits of "running live" in order to get a correct
environment set up, we need a way to link the two testing paradigms.

      To do this, first set up the necessary environment on a live
machine to execute the paths wanted to execute (without any new,
untested code involved).  Then, using the system supplied debug
function, a breakpoint is set just prior to the point where the new
code would begin to execute if it were running live.  When specifying
the breakpoint, a user exit program is also specified which will be
invoked when the breakpoint is encountered.  This user exit program
results in stopping the program in a simple wait state waiting for a
message on a queue.  At this point the environment has been prepared
and the job is "hung."

      The next step is to start the simulator with a connection to
the live machine.  The code to be tested is loaded into the simulator
and linked to the live system. (This does not affect the live system
adversely in any way.) Then, the waiting job is released by sending a
message which satisfies the wait to the queue.   This causes the job
to begin execution on the simulator.  The job remains hung on the
live machine. ...